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March 18th – Federal Reserve Puts Out FOMC Statement

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See the press release: Federal Reserve

Below is the FOMC statement on March 18, 2015.


Release Date: March 18, 2015

For immediate release
Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in January suggests that economic growth has moderated somewhat. Labor market conditions have improved further, with strong job gains and a lower unemployment rate. A range of labor market indicators suggests that underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish. Household spending is rising moderately; declines in energy prices have boosted household purchasing power. Business fixed investment is advancing, while the recovery in the housing sector remains slow and export growth has weakened. Inflation has declined further below the Committee’s longer-run objective, largely reflecting declines in energy prices. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations have remained stable.

Consistent with its statutory mandate, the Committee seeks to foster maximum employment and price stability. The Committee expects that, with appropriate policy accommodation, economic activity will expand at a moderate pace, with labor market indicators continuing to move toward levels the Committee judges consistent with its dual mandate. The Committee continues to see the risks to the outlook for economic activity and the labor market as nearly balanced. Inflation is anticipated to remain near its recent low level in the near term, but the Committee expects inflation to rise gradually toward 2 percent over the medium term as the labor market improves further and the transitory effects of energy price declines and other factors dissipate. The Committee continues to monitor inflation developments closely.

To support continued progress toward maximum employment and price stability, the Committee today reaffirmed its view that the current 0 to 1/4 percent target range for the federal funds rate remains appropriate. In determining how long to maintain this target range, the Committee will assess progress–both realized and expected–toward its objectives of maximum employment and 2 percent inflation. This assessment will take into account a wide range of information, including measures of labor market conditions, indicators of inflation pressures and inflation expectations, and readings on financial and international developments. Consistent with its previous statement, the Committee judges that an increase in the target range for the federal funds rate remains unlikely at the April FOMC meeting. The Committee anticipates that it will be appropriate to raise the target range for the federal funds rate when it has seen further improvement in the labor market and is reasonably confident that inflation will move back to its 2 percent objective over the medium term. This change in the forward guidance does not indicate that the Committee has decided on the timing of the initial increase in the target range.

The Committee is maintaining its existing policy of reinvesting principal payments from its holdings of agency debt and agency mortgage-backed securities in agency mortgage-backed securities and of rolling over maturing Treasury securities at auction. This policy, by keeping the Committee’s holdings of longer-term securities at sizable levels, should help maintain accommodative financial conditions.

When the Committee decides to begin to remove policy accommodation, it will take a balanced approach consistent with its longer-run goals of maximum employment and inflation of 2 percent. The Committee currently anticipates that, even after employment and inflation are near mandate-consistent levels, economic conditions may, for some time, warrant keeping the target federal funds rate below levels the Committee views as normal in the longer run.

Voting for the FOMC monetary policy action were: Janet L. Yellen, Chair; William C. Dudley, Vice Chairman; Lael Brainard; Charles L. Evans; Stanley Fischer; Jeffrey M. Lacker; Dennis P. Lockhart; Jerome H. Powell; Daniel K. Tarullo; and John C. Williams.


AIMco Extends Loan Increase to Razor Energy

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Calgary-based Razor Energy Corporation, a listed junior oil and gas company, locked in an increase of C$ 15 million regarding its non-revolving term loan facility from the Alberta Investment Management Corporation (AIMCo). [ Content protected for Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute Standard subscribers only. Please subscribe to view content. ]

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SWFI First Read, January 18, 2018

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Celgene Eyes Juno Therapeutics

Celegene Corporation is in discussions to buy Seattle-based Juno Therapeutics. Juno Therapeutics has backers which include the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC). Celgene has roughly US$ 12 billion in cash and already has a relationship with Juno Therapeutics.

Auckland International Airport Sells Down Airport Holdings in NQA and Cairns

Perron Investments and The Infrastructure Fund, current investors in North Queensland Airports, which includes Cairns Airport, agreed to acquire Auckland International Airport’s 24.6% stake in the holding entity for A$ 370 million. Perron Investments is the privately-owned investment entity of Australian billionaire Stan Perron.

Pemex and Mitsui in Final Talks on Tula Project

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Apple’s Ginormous Corporate Cash Pile Plans to Come Home

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The positive economic effects of U.S. President Donald Trump’s tax reform have already altered the financial behaviors of major U.S. companies such as Wal-Mart Stores, Apple Inc. and AT&T.

In response to the tax law reform, many American businesses, large-to-small in annual revenues, have issued bonuses, granted awards and signaled plans to increase capital expenditures in the United States. For example, Apple announced plans to give its employees US$ 2,500 each in stock awards. A key section of the new U.S. tax reform law includes a provision for firms to take advantage of a one-time payment of 15.5% on repatriated funds down from the 35% rate.

Initial Plans

With the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) reaching new highs and the tax reform deal signed into law, Apple revealed they would invest US$ 350 billion into the United States economy over a period of five years, as they repatriate massive piles of money from overseas. The iPhone maker estimates they will payout roughly US$ 38 billion in tax payments from the overseas repatriation – thus shifting back some US$ 245 billion out of the US$ 252.3 billion it has held offshore. Apple also plans to spend an estimated US$ 30 billion in capital expenditures over the next five years, with roughly US$ 10 billion in U.S. data centers, according to the company. Apple has plans for 20,000 more jobs to create. The company that was once led by Steve Jobs had faced substantial criticism in the press over outsourcing its manufacturing to China to avoid paying U.S. taxes and lower manufacturing costs. Many of those facilities in China had labor issues such as environmental concerns, slave-like wages and extremely long work hours.

“We believe deeply in the power of American ingenuity, and we are focusing our investments in areas where we can have a direct impact on job creation and job preparedness,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook in a statement on January 17, 2017. He added, “We have a deep sense of responsibility to give back to our country and the people who help make our success possible.”

Liquid Financials and Fixed Income Changes

The sales growth of the iPhone has been a major factor in the growth in Apple’s cash pile. In 2006, Apple moved to act, forming a subsidiary in Nevada to manage investments, initially starting with around US$ 13 billion to manage. Nevada has no corporate income tax and no capital gains tax. Apple manages its investments through an outfit in Reno, Nevada called Braeburn Capital Inc. (Braeburn is a type of Apple), a subsidiary of Apple. Apple also employs some 40 to 50 external fund managers to handle the massive portfolio, according to sources. Braeburn has tried to reduce money management costs by using more separate accounts, while reducing dependence on money market funds.

As of September 30, 2017, Apple has a large investment portfolio worth an excess of US$ 300 billion, with US$ 194.714 billion in long-term marketable securities. Some US$ 128.645 billion are in current assets, with US$ 20.289 billion in cash and cash equivalents.

Focusing on the investment portfolio, some US$ 152.724 billion is held in corporate securities, with US$ 55.245 billion in U.S. Treasuries. Most of the portfolio is held in fixed income investments, including mortgage-backed securities – generally mandating investments be investment-grade and the avoidance of losing principal. Since 2012, Apple has been hoarding more corporate debt, rivaling some bond funds. Only about US$ 799 million are held in mutual funds (non-money market). Apple is also a major buyer of commercial paper across the globe. For example, the company participated in a US$ 500 million issue of 3-year floating notes from Hyundai Capital Services. The tech giant even uses derivatives to hedge against currency and interest rate movements.

The Old Scheme Ends

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