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China should cut dollars if U.S. too loose: sovereign fund

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According to Reuters, “China should sell dollars and diversify its foreign exchange reserves if the United States sticks to loose monetary policy, the head of the Chinese sovereign wealth fund said in an article published this week.  Lou Jiwei, chairman of the $300 billion China Investment Corp, also offered policy advice to the United States, saying the best course of action would be for it to tighten monetary conditions while ramping up stimulus spending.  He said the United States did not have much to gain from monetary easing, because little cash was entering the real economy and a large amount was leaving the country via dollar-funded carry trades.  Under such conditions, the dollar would steadily depreciate, and Asian economies and oil exporters might lose faith in it as a global reserve currency, he said.

“For China, the chief tools to reduce economic risks are to strengthen regulation of capital flows, control liquidity through cash management, monitor asset markets and divert foreign exchange reserves to non-dollar assets,” Lou said.

The article was published this week as part of a book for the Second Summer Palace Dialogue, a meeting of American and Chinese economists that took place in Beijing.

It appeared that Lou had written the article at least several months earlier, but this was the first time that it had been published.  There is evidence that China has, in fact, stepped up its pace of foreign exchange diversification this year, cutting back its vast holdings of U.S. Treasuries and buying record amounts of Japanese and South Korean debt.  But Lou said that it was not too late for the dollar. A move toward tighter monetary policy would reduce expectations of depreciation, restrain the dollar-funded carry trade and support global financial stability, he said.  For the U.S. economy, tighter monetary policy could also pay unexpected dividends, he said.

“If the dollar carry-trade lessens and capital from Asian countries and oil-exporting countries continues to flow to the United States, then liquidity in the United States might even increase,” he said.”

Read more: Reuters

SA FinMin: PIC CEO Plans to Resign

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Dr Dan Matjila, the Chief Executive Officer of the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) of South Africa, plans to resign according to South Africa’s finance ministry, which oversees the organization. The finance ministry commented that PIC’s board was dealing with Matjila’s intentions. [ Content protected for Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute Standard subscribers only. Please subscribe to view content. ]

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Goldman Sachs Sued by Abu Dhabi SWF Unit

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International Petroleum Investment Company (IPIC), which is now wrapped up into Abu Dhabi-based Mubadala Investment Company, is suing Goldman Sachs over its role in the 1MBD international corruption scandal. IPIC, through its unit Aabar Investments, was once an investment partner of 1Malaysia Development Berhad (IMDB). In the lawsuit, Aabar believes Goldman Sachs conspired with others to bribe both IPIC and Aabar Investment former executives. SWFI and other media outlets have written extensively on the matter.

In the fall, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) already unsealed criminal charges against key players in the massive fraudulent scheme, while Malaysian government officials have jailed its former prime minister Najib Razak.

Lloyd Blankfein, the recent former CEO of Goldman Sachs, attended a 2009 meeting with Malaysian financier Jho Low (name: Low Taek Jho). According to various media sources, Blankfein is the unidentified Goldman executive who attended the 2009 meeting in New York in the U.S. court documents.

Goldman Sachs faces a plethora of lawsuits and regulatory probes stemming from its involvement in the 1MDB scandal.

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EXPORT DREAMS: American Reliance on World Oil at an Inflection Point

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Remember the days of experts talking about peak oil. The peak oil concept is the point in which the global petroleum production rate starts its inevitable historic decline. [ Content protected for Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute Standard subscribers only. Please subscribe to view content. ]

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